about

android

eharmony

people problem

I’m not sure what my matches see when they look at my profile.

business problem

Android profile completion was 25% worse than eharmony’s mobile average. Spaghetti code made new features expensive to build.



about

context + team

In 2016, the eharmony Android app looked crazy. There were four different UI patterns.

From a tech perspective, we were supporting old libraries and legacy code. In order to kill the spaghetti code, we needed to rebuild the profile edit and photo upload experiences. Since it was a complete rebuild, I took the opportunity to improve the experience based on research insights earlier in the year.

The executive team gave Jasmine (PM), Luis (Engineer), Raghu (Engineer), Marty (Engineer) and myself (Design) six weeks to address the tech and design debt. Due to the accelerated deadline, this was a super-close collaboration as we raced against the clock!


material theme

about

she adds photos to her profile

about
about

she adds photos to her profile

Uploading multiple photos at once was a crucial use case, since people collect the photos they want to add ahead of time.*

*from behavioral interviews.

about

she adds context to her photos

It was important for her to be able to clarify who’s in her photos, especially in a crowd – or if she’s with a guy.*

*from behavioral interviews.

about

she edits her profile

To focus on each field, she lands on a separate activity to write or select items. Another iteration (not shown) included entries in dialogs, which felt too cramped.



about

impact + retro

When I left eharmony in 2017, Android was outperforming desktop and mobile web in profile completion and photo upload rates.

Remote, unmoderated usability taught us that members wanted to crop their photos and rearrange the order.